High Fiber Vegetables

Digestive functioning can be improved by increasing the intake of foods rich in fiber. One of the most vital functions of high quality fiber is to facilitate the mobilization of food through the digestive tract. High amount of fiber in your diet also reduces the risk of obesity, diabetes and heart diseases. One of the most vital sources of fiber as well as nutrition is high fiber vegetables. Read to learn about some excellent sources of fiber.

The Importance of Fiber

There are two types of dietary fiber: soluble and insoluble. After entering into the stomach, soluble fiber converts into gel and slows the digestion process down, lowering blood glucose and cholesterol level at the same time. While insoluble fiber remains the same all the way to colon, it increases the weight of waste and softens it to smooth the transit of fecal particles through the intestines. Most plant-based foods contain the mixture of both types. Taking less fiber than required can cause constipation, which makes the process of defecation difficult and painful, as we say "backed up". Lack of fiber in your diet can also cause difficulty controlling glucose level as well as the appetite. Therefore, high fiber vegetables play a very important role in controlling the digestion speed and satiety.

According to the Institute of Medicine, men below 50 should consume around 38g fiber every day while the recommended consumption for women is 25g. Adults older than 50 years require less fiber due to decreased food intake, accounting for 30g for males and 21g for females.

High Fiber Vegetables

Most vegetables are enriched with fiber and other nutritional elements, some of which contain the most fiber, including:

Peas

Peas, whether fresh green or dried, are always rich in high quality fiber. In fact the fiber in peas has been studied as a functional ingredient for most nutritious foods. Fresh or frozen green peas can be either used in soups or stews or even in side dishes like salads, dips and casseroles.

 

Type

Serving

Fiber Content

Cooked blackeyes (cow peas)

1 cup

11g

Cooked pigeon peas

1 cup

9g

Cooked and split peas

1 cup

16g

Frozen green peas

1 cup

14g

Cooked edible podded peas

1 cup

5g

Squash

Squash is another great source of fiber intake, whether it is summer or winter squash. These high fiber vegetables are a part of gourd family and occur in a variety of flavors, colors and textures. It can be cooked into stews, soups, casseroles, salads and other side dishes too. Grilled squash brushed with olive oil is healthy and delicious at the same time.

Type

Serving

Fiber Content

Cooked crookneck squash

1 cup

3g

Cooked summer scallop squash

1 cup

5g

Cooked Hubbard squash

1 cup

7g

Cooked zucchini squash

1 cup

3g

Cooked acorn squash

1 cup

9g

Cooked spaghetti squash

1 cup

2g

Dark Green Leafy Veggies

Deep green veggies do not only contain lots of carotene, vitamins and minerals but are also rich in fiber. These high fiber vegetables are of more than 1,000 types and are used in a variety of salads and can be sautéed, along with lemon, herbs and garlic.

 

Type

Serving

Fiber Content

Cooked turnip greens

1 cup

5g

Cooked mustard greens

1 cup

5g

Cooked collard greens

1 cup

5g

Cooked spinach

1 cup

4g

Cooked beet greens

1 cup

4g

Cooked Swiss chard

1 cup

4g

Brassica

Brassica vegetables contain rich amount of glucosinolates, which can be used to cure cancer, but they are also packed with high quality fiber. These high fiber vegetables include broccoli, sprouts, cauliflower, kale and cabbage. They can be prepared by stir-frying and enjoyed in soups, stews and salads, or steamed and served as a side dish.

Type

Serving

Fiber Content

Cooked kale

1 cup

3g

Cooked cauliflower

1 cup

5g

Raw kohlrabi

1 cup

5g

Cooked savory cabbage

1 cup

4g

Cooked broccoli

1 cup

5g

Cooked Brussel sprouts

1 cup

6g

Cooked red cabbage

1 cup

4g

Potatoes

Potatoes are rich in fiber. Their popularity in America makes it easy for people to pump up some fiber in the body. Not just russets, there are more varieties of potatoes enriched with nutrients and delicious taste. Even the potato peal contains a lot of fiber, so don't reap it off before eating. They can be added to salads, soups, stews or simply baked.

 

Type

Serving

Fiber Content

Flesh and skin of russet potato

Medium sized

4g

Flesh and skin of red potato

Medium sized

3g

Flesh and skin of sweet potato

Medium sized

4g

Besides the 5 main types mentioned above, other vegetables that are high in fiber content include:

Carrots

It is a crunchy, delicious root vegetable which is rich in nutrition, Vitamin K and B6, Beta carotene and antioxidant that converts into Vitamin A when entered into the body.

In one cup of carrots, there is 3.4g fiber; and in each 100 grams of carrot, there is 2.8g fiber.

Beets

One of the high fiber vegetables is beet. It is a root veggie having nutrients like iron, copper, potassium and manganese. Beetroot also provides benefits related to human blood pressure and regulates it by the inorganic nitrates present in it.

In a cup, there's 3.8g of fiber; and 2.8g in every 100 grams of beetroot.

Artichokes

Mostly people are not aware of this high fiber vegetable and not even accustomed to its benefits. It has high amount of nutrients and fiber.

In an artichoke, there is 6.9g of fiber; and in every 100 gram there's 5.4 g.

Parsnips

Being one of the many high fiber vegetables, parsnip has a sweet nutty flavor with fragrance of an herbal twist. They are enriched with 60%more dietary fibers than that of a carrot. Potassium is also filled in great amount in parsnips, which helps your muscles to work properly.

In every cup of parsnip, there is 7g fiber.

Sun-Dried Tomatoes

Super-markets run out of fresh tomatoes when they are not in season, this is when sun-dried tomatoes play the big role. They have intense flavor and more fiber than you imagined. They also contain lycopene and are low in sodium.

In every half a cup of sun dried tomatoes, there is 3.5g of fiber.

 
 
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